Structural Elements for Architects and Builders Design of Columns, Beams and Tension Elements in Wood, Steel and Reinforced Concrete By Jonathan Ochshorn

Contents Preface ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. vii List of examples …………………………………………………………………………………………….ix List of appendices ………………………………………………………………………………………… xi CHAPTER 1 Statics ………………………………………………………………………………….. 1 Tributary areas ……………………………………………………………………….. 2 Equilibrium ……………………………………………………………………………. 7 Reactions ……………………………………………………………………………… 10 Internal forces and moments ………………………………………………….. 17 Indeterminate structures ………………………………………………………… 31 Strength of materials ……………………………………………………………… 33 CHAPTER 2 Loads ………………………………………………………………………………….. 39 Dead loads ……………………………………………………………………………. 39 Live loads …………………………………………………………………………….. 41 Environmental loads ………………………………………………………………. 46 CHAPTER 3 Material properties ……………………………………………………………. 61 Wood …………………………………………………………………………………… 63 Steel …………………………………………………………………………………….. 68 Reinforced concrete ……………………………………………………………… 70 CHAPTER 4 Sectional properties ………………………………………………………….. 73 Wood …………………………………………………………………………………… 73 Steel …………………………………………………………………………………….. 74 Reinforced concrete…

Design of Reinforced Concrete 9th Edition By Jack C. McCormac and Russell H. Brown

Brief Contents Preface xv 1 Introduction ……………… 1 2 Flexural Analysis of Beams……………… 35 3 Strength Analysis of Beams According to ACI Code……………… 65 4 Design of Rectangular Beams and One-Way Slabs ………………82 5 Analysis and Design of T Beams and Doubly Reinforced Beams……………… 112 6 Serviceability……………… 154 7 Bond, Development Lengths, and Splices……………… 184 8 Shear and Diagonal Tension……………… 223 9 Introduction to Columns ………………263 10 Design of Short Columns Subject to Axial Load and Bending ………………281 11 Slender Columns ………………317 12 Footings ………………347 13 Retaining Walls ………………394 14…

Safety Management near Miss Identification, Recognition, and Investigation By Ron C. McKinnon, CSP

Contents Preface……………………………………………………………………………………………………….xv Acknowledgments……………………………………………………………………………………….xix About the Author………………………………………………………………………………………..xxi Chapter 1 Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….1 Clearing the Confusion……………………………………………………………….1 Minor Injury Is Not a Near Miss Incident……………………………………..1 Near Miss Incidents…………………………………………………………………….2 Defining a Near Miss Incident…………………………………………………2 Defining an Accident………………………………………………………………2 Conflicting Definitions……………………………………………………………4 Accidents versus Near Miss Incidents…………………………………………..4 Accidents, Near Miss Incidents, and Injuries…………………………………4 Defining an Injury………………………………………………………………….5 General Agencies……………………………………………………………….5 Occupational Hygiene Agencies…………………………………………..5 Definitions: Injuries and Diseases…………………………………………………5 Work Injury…………………………………………………………………………..5 Occupational Disease…………………………………………………………6 Injury Compared to Accident………………………………………………6 Facts Concerning Undesired Events and Near Miss Incidents and Accidents………………………………………………………………………..6 Accident Sequence……………………………………………………………………..7 Failure to Assess the Risk……………………………………………………….7 Lack of Control………………………………………………………………………7 Basic Causes or Root Causes……………………………………………………8 Immediate…

Modern Experimental Stress Analysis Completing the Solution of Partially Specified Problems By James F. Doyle

Introduction This book is based on the assertion that, in modern stress analysis, constructing the model is constructing the solution—that the model is the solution. But all model representations of real structures must be incomplete; after all, we cannot be completely aware of every material property, every aspect of the loading, and every condition of the environment, for any particular structure. Therefore, as a corollary to the assertion, we posit that a very important role of modern experimental stress analysis is to aid in completing the construction of the model….

Precast Concrete Structures, Second Edition By Kim S Elliott

Preference: What makes precast concrete different from other forms of concrete construction? Whether concrete is precast, that is statically reinforced or pretension (prestressed), is not always apparent. It is only when we consider the role concrete will play in developing structural characteristics that its precast nature becomes significant. The most obvious definition of precast concrete is that it is concrete which has been prepared for casting, cast and cured in a location which is not its final destination. The distance traveled from the casting site may only be a few…

Introduction to Civil Engineering Systems A Systems Perspective to the Development of Civil Engineering Facilities By Samuel Labi

Description This book presents an integrated systems approach to the evaluation, analysis, design, and maintenance of civil engineering systems. Addressing recent concerns about the world’s aging civil infrastructure and its environmental impact, the author makes the case for why any civil infrastructure should be seen as part of a larger whole. He walks readers through all phases of a civil project, from feasibility assessment to construction to operations, explaining how to evaluate tasks and challenges at each phase using a holistic approach. Unique coverage of ethics, legal issues, and management…

Highway and Traffic Engineering in Developing Countries By Bent Thagesen

Preference : The main purpose of this book is to meet a pronounced need for a textbook on planning, design, construction, maintenance, and management of roads and traffic in the traditional developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Most of these countries, which do not include the former Eastern Bloc countries, are situated in the tropics, where the natural conditions are different from related conditions in temperate regions. Also, the institutional issues and the financial problems confronting countries in the ‘South’ are usually different from the state of affairs…

Global Structural Analysis of Buildings By Karoly A.Zalka

Introduction The global structural analysis of buildings can be carried out following two routes. First, sophisticated and complex computer packages based on the finite element method offer endless facilities and can handle even huge structures with a great number of elements. Second, analytical methods can also deal with whole structures leading to simple closed-form solutions, with the additional benefit of providing fast checking facilities for the computer-based methods. In applying physical and mathematical models which are based on the global behavior of building structures, a unified treatment of the stress,…